Weekly Photo Challenge: Community

PostaWeek

The photographs that popped up in my mind was some that I took in Cheyenne , WY.
We just stopped over for a day or two and stayed for a month. While we were there they held a state pumpkin competition. We saw an article in the local paper and decided to go and watch. You could feel the compassion and the sense of community in the air. It was fun to see all these huge pumpkins that only have a 90 day growing season.
I decided I wouldn’t want to go on a pumpkin diet.

This people brought a couple of pumpkins and there daughters. The girls seem very happy and enjoying the weigh in.DSC00374 copy

These guys are all competitors and everyone was jumping in the help each other with there measuring and weighing.

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This grandpa and his granddaughters were real proud of there pumpkin that weighed in about 500 pounds.

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All these people are waiting to have there pumpkin weighed. This was just a small part of the crowd that was there.

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The guy on the right in the gray shirt took the championship.

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This was the champion!

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We had a good time and stayed for the whole show.

There is one other picture of community that I want to show and that is this little boys community of his stuffed characters that he so proudly displayed for me.

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11 thoughts on “Weekly Photo Challenge: Community

    • I was watching Bobby Flay the other day and he said the pumpkin pies that you buy in the store are not pumpkin – they are some kind of squash. I don’t remember the name of it. He claimed that some time ago he tried to duplicate the flavor of the pies in the stores and found out that pumpkin is to bitter and stringy to taste like the store bought pies. I’ve never tried to bake a pumpkin pie so I can only believe what a chief like Bobby Flay says is true. Everything with a grain of salt. Thank you for leaving me a comment.

      • Over here they use a thing called gramma (not sure on the spelling of it). I’ve used a pumpkin and it isn’t as good for pies but still enjoyably edible. I’m a bit of a heathen as I just call anything that looks hard on the outside with a thick skin and orange on the inside a pumpkin. 🙂

      • There was more to the show with Bobby Flay so I looked it up. What is really in a can of pumpkin that you buy at the store and this what I found. I’m sorry it is a little, but then I don’t want to give out wrong information.

        A lot of professional and home chefs swear by canned pumpkin for its convenience and consistent flavor and texture. But we recently learned something rather surprising about this pantry item…It turns out that some canned pumpkin is actually – gasp! – squash. Some manufacturers make “pumpkin” puree from one or more kinds of winter squashes such as butternut, Hubbard, and Boston Marrow, which can be less stringy and richer in sweetness and color.
        But before we start crying fraud, it is interesting to note the rather fuzzy distinction between pumpkins and squashes. There are three varieties of winter squashes: Cucurbita pepo, Cucurbita maxima, and Curcubita moschata. C. pepo includes the gourds we traditionally think of as pumpkins, such as the kind used for jack-o’-lanterns. Hubbard and Boston Marrow squashes fall into the C. maxima category, while C. moschata includes butternut squashes as well as the Dickinson pumpkins used by Libby’s, the producer of most of the canned pumpkin in North America.

      • That was great. I’ve never heard of canned pumpkin. Didn’t even know it existed. I’ll have to check out our supermarket shelves and see if it is sold here. I guess to be safe we should just say “i’m making curcubita pie for dessert.” Thanks for checking out that info.

  1. Those are some serious pumpkins!! I’ve seen pie pumpkins before and they’re not big like the Halloween pumpkins. As for Wyoming, we love it there, although we go north farther, to Sheridan. Great state.

    janet

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